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206 – Pool Progress

In case you haven’t been reading this. Here’s a quick recap.

My name is Philip ‘Oggers’ Ogley and I’m looking after a villa for the winter on the Arcachon basin in France. One of my main tasks, among many, concerns cleaning and maintaining the natural swimming pool.

There are actually three pools here that make up the swimming pool unit. A filtration bed that looks like a giant sandpit filled with gravel. The swimming pool itself, which for some bizarre reason, is in the shape of a coffin. And a regeneration reservoir.

This is how it all works. After the water has trickled down through the filtration bed, it’s pumped into the swimming pool and then left to trickle over its walls into the regeneration reservoir where plants such as sedge and water hyacinth filter it and the microbes feed on the algae.

(Artwork copyright Philip Ogley 2015. Courtesy of the Tate Gallery London)

pool

Getting rid of the algae is why you go to all this trouble. Algae is what makes swimming pools go green. In a perfect environment the whole system should clean itself. The perfect environment being a place with no trees or shrubs – a hill top or a desert for example.

Unless you live in these places, leaves are going to get into your pool whether you like it or not. Leaves are bad. They introduce nutrients into the pool which encourage the growth of algae. And remember algae is bad.

I removed the leaves last week. They’re gone. Dead in the water as it were (or not). This week my task was to remove the two inch thick layer of algal scum covering the filtration bed.

So enter Oggers once again with his pool hoover sucking the scum off the top of the filtration bed and letting it flow back in to clog it all up again. Problem.

So I found a fine mesh to filter it through. This half worked. It took the larger sediment out, but still allowed the fine algae to pollute the system. Like hoovering your carpet and then emptying the dirty bag over the floor.

The only sensible solution was to let the dirty water go free. Flush it over the side. Rid the system of this filth once and for all. So I did. And within a few days the water looked sparkling. That is, what water was left…

Oops. I’d forgotten the principle of the whole system. It’s contained. The water goes round and round. Just like the water cycle you learn about in geography at school. Nothing is added and nothing is taken away. Unless some buffoon empties half of it into the sea.

Of course, in the grand scheme of things, I hadn’t changed a thing – the water would one day find its way into the sea. But on the smaller scheme of things, I might lose my job.

It was time for some Oggers quick thinking while my boss was out for lunch. And like cooling down on a hot summer’s day, there’s nothing a hosepipe can’t fix. I quickly hooked it up and turned it on full, hoping the boss was on a long lunch. About 4 hours I was thinking – the time it would take to refill it.

By a stroke of luck he was out for the entire afternoon. Incroyable! By the time he got back the filtration bed was brimming with fresh water.

Now I just have to see what happens over the weekend. Hope the tap water I used from the hose wasn’t full of chlorine. Then I’ll be Oggers The Pool Boy no more.

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5 thoughts on “206 – Pool Progress

  1. Frank says:

    Hi Phil
    I’ve been following you for a while now and find your adventures very interesting !!
    The reason for me contacting you is that I have built a pool similar to yours and we fitted UV filter tubes to the system and they kill all the bad germs and Algae, if you haven’t got one it might be worth talking to the owner ?
    Regards
    Frank.

    • Hi Frank,
      Thanks for the comment. Just wondering where your pool is. I think the climate depends on what type of pool system you have. This is by the sea in western France. I think UV tubes would be a good investment as it gets very hot here in summer, hence loads of algae. However, I think they advertise the pool as a Natural Swimming Pool (NSP). Whereas if you have UV, it’s classed as Non-Natural. And this is France where everything has to be classified and official, if you know what I mean. Also, there’s probably tax breaks for NSPs and not for non-NSPs. It’s my first time doing this work and all very interesting.

      Anyway, thanks for reading the blog. I’ll keep you posted on the progress.
      Regards
      Philip

  2. Pingback: 207 – Pool Progress (Update) | BLOGLEY

  3. Pingback: 212 – Lessons in Pool Hoovering | BLOGLEY

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